blogging

Hello Slicehost Planet

Hi, I'm Dave and it has been 10 days since I ran up a new slice.

I have been using slicehost for over 2 years to host various VMs. I run a Free / Open Source focused IT Consulting and programming business based in Victoria, Australia.

This blog contains a good mix of geeky stuff about whatever we are working on at DHC, rants about annoying things / companies along with the occasional thing from "real life". A lot of the stuff that gets blogged about is running on slicehost VMs or at least has been tested on them.

This blog is now being syndicated on the Slicehost Planet. The future of the Slicehost planet is unclear, support have suggested that it suffer the same fate as USA-193, while others insist it is staying. For now at least they are adding new blogs, so long as they hosted on their VMs. If you have a blog running on a slice, email support at slicehost and ask them to add your feed to the planet.

Site Refresh

Our site hasn't changed very much over the last 4 years, but the business has changed a lot. The biggest change was the (uneventful and long overdue) upgrade to Drupal 6 a few months ago.

During the last week or so the site has been updated and refocused. The major changes include:

This also signals our return to regular blogging. There are a few posts in the pipeline. There should be a good mix of drupal and sys admin posts in the coming weeks.

As always, feedback is welcome.

<?php print t('hello world'); ?>

My blog is now syndicated on Planet Drupal. I am very excited about this - thanks Simon.

For the last 8 years or so I have been running my own IT consulting business, focusing on free/open source software and web application development. My clients have range from micro businesses up to well known geek brands like SGI. Until recently I lead the phpGroupWare project.

My Drupal profile doesn't really give much of a hint about my involvement with Drupal. My biggest regret is not signing up for a d.o account sooner. I forget when I started using Drupal 4.7, but I liked it straight away. It was the first CMS which worked the way I thought a CMS should work.

Over time I have learned how to get Drupal to do what I want it to do. Due to the massive range of contrib modules I haven't got my hands very dirty hacking on Drupal - yet.

This year I have been involved in a major Drupal project which involves hosting around 2100 sites. Aegir has made a lot of this painless, especially with our 3,000 line install profile. Over the Christmas period I hope to find the time to blog about the setup, parts of it are pretty crazy.

I'll get around to upgrading my site to Drupal 6 one of these days when I get some time, that should coincide with a visual and content refresh. Feel free to check out some of my older Drupal related posts.

Are sploggers getting smarter?

Some time ago I switched from using Akismet to Mollom. When I made the switch I was preparing to (finally) migrate to Drupal 6, but that project has stalled. I also though it would be a better idea to use something developed by acquia, rather than the compeition.

After switching to Mollom I noticed the number of comments I was getting went through the floor, even though I kept the module up to date.

After some complaints from users I disabled caching and allowed Mollom approved comments to be posted without moderation.

There has been a big problem with my recent changes - the sploggers are winning. It seems if a splogger quotes a paragraph or 2 from the item they are commenting on, they're getting through. I haven't been able to find a way of telling if it is humans entering the CAPTCHAs or if it is bots exploiting a weakness in Mollom.

Either way I think this is a problem that needs to be sorted. No I don't have any suggestions for solving it, I am busy solving other issues - so please don't label me an OSDB. Well given only the Mollon client is FOSS and I suspect the problem is in the (proprietary) backend, I can duck that accusation :)

Back Blogging Again

Bless me internet for I haven't blogged, it has been 274 days since my last post.

I have wanted to blog, but I kept on finding excuses to avoid it - need to upgrade the software, need to finish x, y and z, need to focus on projects a, b and c etc. One of the main reasons is that I have been too lazy to put the effort in. I find it takes time to think of what to blog and then to bash it out, refine it and post it. When I have had the time to put that effort into my blog, I haven't had the inclination.

While things have been quiet here, I have microblogging using the open source laconica platform through identi.ca, which also posts to StixCampNewstead.

More recently I have been working with a client in France who has some serious collaboration requirements. At last count they have almost 2100 instances of drupal running. This has involved a lot of work, and some travel. I will blog about this project soon - it is pretty awesome (even if I say so myself).

We have built a small drupal powered site for a local assest management consulting business. They are very happy with the results. Now their customers just log in to download the software. Everything was off the shelf drupal - except for the theme and a 60 line custom permissions module.

We have built the Newstead community website using drupal. It still needs some polish before final launch. The community has been heavily involved in the development of the site. So far over 30 locals have been trained in maintaining their page/s on the site. There is no "webmaster", each local business and community group will maintain their own content

A couple of months ago I/we joined the drupal association. One day the buttons will be added to the site.

Where to next?

I plan to blog more about projects I am involved in. I also plan to switch this site to drupal 7 as close as possible to the release date - it looks like others will be switching too. Next week I will be commencing the build of the Newstead community wireless network.

Watch this space, lots happening - including more frequent updates from here on in.

Hello Planet Ubuntu Australia

Last week my blog was added to Planet Ubuntu Australia, the syndication site for Australian Ubuntu LoCo participants' blogs.

I have been rather busy with work and family commitments lately. I am hoping to give my poor neglected blog a little more TLC.

hello_world.c

$ cat hello_world.c #include <stdio.h> main() { printf ("Hello World!\n"); }
$ gcc hello_world.c -o hello_world
$ chmod +x hello_world
$ ./ hello_world
Hello World!
$

I have started playing with C recently. I am still finding it annoying, yet enjoyable at the same time. The PHP developers have spoilt me (and other PHP coders). PHP gives you most of the power of C, without having to deal with annoying string handling, easy arrays, memory management and having to build to test. I am sure there is more.

Unlike OS X, I think I will persist with C.

Other than reminding myself of how to do hello world in C, why did I post this? I thought you would never ask, it is because my blog is now syndicated on Planet Linux Australia. I am pretty honoured by being added. Hopefully there are others who appreciate my rants :)

Google Analytics

As some of you may have noticed I use Google Analytics on my site for statistics. I also use webalizer for basic visitor stats. I have found Google Analytics provides more information in a better format than webalizer. The downsides of Google Analytics is that it is non free SaaS, it uses flash and that is lacks the ability to drill down to get more information.

As of today, the flash problem is still there (I am yet to test it with gnash), but the amount of information and how that data is displayed has improved dramatically. For those of you interested in the new look analytics, google has produced a tour.

Here is a quick summary my stats:

If you made it this far you are either a) a very fast reader, b) skipped a lot of the stats, c) unlike 80% of my visitors who leave the site within the first minute (read they got bored with reading my long blog posts).

Blog Spam

I think I am pretty lucky that I only have 1 comment spammer on my blog. Every day he posts an ever expanding list of links for whatever he is being paid to post, this week it is ring tones. "nareman" give up! The combination of moderation and Akismet means that the posts get round filed. Akismet is a great tool, I recommend it to anyone who enables comments on their blog. If I had more traffic and comments, I would probably pay for a commercial license.

Very Rough Guide

When I go to the library I regularly check out what computer books are sitting on the shelf. Some books seem to be there every time I go in, such as iTunes 6 and iPod for windows and Macintosh. I usually end up grabbing one or 2 books on something I am at least vaguely interested in. I usually end up flicking through them over a month, and forget most of it a week later.

On my latest visit I picked up The Rough Guide to Blogging, by Jonathan Yang. I wasn't expecting to learn a lot out of it, but I hoped that there might be a few little gems or at least 1 thing that I didn't already know.

In general the book is ok. If you are new to blogging there is quite a few things that you can learn from reading a book like this. It seems to be pitched at people who use computers to get a job done, not geeks - that's cool. You shouldn't have to be a geek to read a book on a topic such as blogging.

Unfortunately the book's target audience probably isn't as well versed in convention and netiquette as a geek would be. As a geek reading the book I found myself thinking "hmm" on a few occasions. Then I found a wtf?! show stopper on page 79. Here is the quote under the heading "Loading images from other websites" (my emphasis):

You can use an image from elsewhere on the Web without copying it to your server. Simply find the address of the individual image (not the page it's displayed on) and use the IMG tag in the usual way.

Before posting an image on your blog, however, it's best to ask for permission from the copyright holder. In reality, nothing is likely to happen to you for using an image without permission - especially in the case of celebrity photos and other commonly circulated stock photos - but at the very least it's polite to ask before using, say, a drawing from an artist's website.

Generally hotlinking is considered by many as a copyright violation and bandwidth theft. Most webmasters don't approve of others using their content and bandwidth without permission. Not so long ago, US Senator and potential Presidential cantidate John McCain found out what happens when you hotlink. There are numerous other examples of disgruntled copyright holders and webmasters taking action against hotlinkers.

Given the size of the copyright notice in the footer on his site, Jonathan seems to take his copyright pretty seriously, pity that his respect doesn't seem to extend to others' works.

Update: I emailed Jonathan a link to this post and he has replied.

Thanks for reading and reviewing the book. The section you referenced about "hotlinking." Definitely not good blogger etiquette. I should probably post something about the importance of not only asking permission but also hosting your own images. I hope I meant "use the images, but host them yourself" but clearly the text doesn't reflect that.

Further Update: Jonathan has posted a clarification post on his blog (since moved to a different url).