drupal

Upcoming Book Reviews

Packt Publishing seem to have liked my review of Drupal 6 Javascript and jQuery, so much so they have asked me to review another title. On my return from linux.conf.au and Drupal South in New Zealand, a copy of the second edition of AJAX and PHP was waiting for me at the post office. I'll be reading and reviewing the book during February.

I will cover LCA and Drupal South in other blog posts once I have some time to sit down and reflect on the events. For now I will just gloat about winning a spot prize at Drupal South. I walked away with Emma Jane Hogbin and Konstantin Käfer's book, Front End Drupal. I've wanted to buy this title for a while, but shipping from the US made it a bit too pricey even with the strong Australian Dollar. I hope to start reading it in a few weeks, with a review to follow shortly after.

Got a book for me to review? I only read books in dead tree format as I mostly read when I want to get away from the screen. Feel free to contact me to discuss it further.

Updating all of your Drupal Sites at Once - aka Lazy Person's Aegir

Aegir is an excellent way to manage multi site drupal instances, but sometimes it can be a bit too heavy. For example if you have a handful of sites, it can be overkill to deploy aegir. If there is an urgent security fix and you have a lot of sites (I am talking 100s if not 1000s) to patch, waiting for aegir to migrate and verify all of your sites can be a little too slow.

For these situations I have a little script which I use to do the heavy lifting. I keep in ~/bin/update-all-sites and it has a single purpose, to update all of my drupal instances with a single command. Just like aegir, my script leverages drush, but unlike aegir there is no parachute, so if something breaks during the upgrade you get to keep all of the pieces. If you use this script, I would recommend always backing up all of your databases first - just in case.

I keep my "platforms" in svn, so before running the script I run a svn switch or svn update depending on how major the update is. If you are using git or bzr, you would do something similar first. If you aren't using any form of version control - I feel sorry for your clients.

So here is the code, it should be pretty self explanatory - if not ask questions via the comments.

#!/bin/sh # Update all drupal sites at once using drush - aka lazy person's aegir # # Written by Dave Hall # Copyright (c) 2009 Dave Hall Consulting http://davehall.com.au # # This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or # modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License # as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 # of the License, or (at your option) any later version. # Alternatively you may use and/or distribute it under the terms # of the CC-BY-SA license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ # Change this to point to your instance of drush isn't in your path DRUSH_CMD="drush" if [ $# != 1 ]; then     SCRIPT="`basename $0`"     echo "Usage: $SCRIPT path-to-drupal-install"     exit 1; fi SITES_PATH="$1" PWD=$(pwd) cd "$SITES_PATH/sites"; for site in `find ./ -maxdepth 1 -type d | cut -d/ -f2 | egrep -v '(.git|.bzr|.svn|all|^$)'`; do     if [ -f "${site}/settings.php" ]; then         echo updating $site         $DRUSH_CMD updatedb -y -l $site     fi done # Lets go back to where we started cd "$PWD"

OK, so my script isn't any where as awesome as aegir, but if you are lazy (or in a hurry) it can come in handy. Most of the time you will probably still want to use aegir.

Notes:

Make sure you make the script executable (hint run chmod +x /path/to/update-all-sites)

If you don't have drush in your path, I would recommend you add it, but if you can't then change DRUSH_CMD="drush" to point to your instance of drush - such as DRUSH_CMD="/opt/drush/drush".

Thanks to Peter Lieverdink (aka cafuego) for suggesting the improved regex.

<?php print t('hello world'); ?>

My blog is now syndicated on Planet Drupal. I am very excited about this - thanks Simon.

For the last 8 years or so I have been running my own IT consulting business, focusing on free/open source software and web application development. My clients have range from micro businesses up to well known geek brands like SGI. Until recently I lead the phpGroupWare project.

My Drupal profile doesn't really give much of a hint about my involvement with Drupal. My biggest regret is not signing up for a d.o account sooner. I forget when I started using Drupal 4.7, but I liked it straight away. It was the first CMS which worked the way I thought a CMS should work.

Over time I have learned how to get Drupal to do what I want it to do. Due to the massive range of contrib modules I haven't got my hands very dirty hacking on Drupal - yet.

This year I have been involved in a major Drupal project which involves hosting around 2100 sites. Aegir has made a lot of this painless, especially with our 3,000 line install profile. Over the Christmas period I hope to find the time to blog about the setup, parts of it are pretty crazy.

I'll get around to upgrading my site to Drupal 6 one of these days when I get some time, that should coincide with a visual and content refresh. Feel free to check out some of my older Drupal related posts.

Drupal 6 JavaScript and jQuery

I have just finished reading Matt Butcher's latest book, Drupal 6 JavaScript and jQuery, published by Packt Publishing - ISBN 978-1-847196-16-3. It is a good read. It is one of those books that arrived at the right time and left me inspired.

I have always leaned towards Yahoo's YUI toolkit when I need an Ajax framework, while the rest of the time I just bash out a bit of JS to get the job done. The more I use Drupal, the more I have been wanting to find time to get into jQuery. This book has got me motivated to play with jQuery - especially in combination with Drupal.

The book is logically structured and flows well from chapter to chapter. I find Matt's writing style easy to read, he even brought a smile to my face a few times. Matt assumes a basic knowledge of JS and Drupal, but he also provides links so the reader is able to get additional information if their knowledge is lacking. However, a couple of times Matt seemed to switch quite abruptly from assuming a good level of knowledge on a particular topic to explaining what seemed to me to be basic or simple concepts in great detail.

In the first chapter, entitled Drupal and JavaScript, Matt covers the basics of Drupal, its relationship with JavaScript and recommends some essential items for any serious Drupal developer's toolbox. This chapter provides a nice introduction of what is to come in the rest of the book and allows the reader to become acquainted with Matt's style.

Working with JavaScript in Drupal covers the basics of the Drupal coding standards and why sticking to the standard is important. It then moves onto a quick overview of Drupal's theme engine, PHPTemplate, and integrating JS with Drupal themes. I felt that the development practices part of this chapter could have been expanded a bit more and turned into its own chapter. Understanding the basics of theming is critical for being able to follow the rest of the book, but again I think this half of the chapter could have been developed into a separate chapter. Regardless of how the chapter was arranged, the content is well written and provides solid and practical examples.

In jQuery: Do More with Drupal, Matt gives a detailed overview of jQuery and how it is used in Drupal. Although the code sample has limited real world usefulness, it provides the reader with a very clear idea of the power of jQuery and how easy it is to use with Drupal. By the end of this chapter I was left feeling like I wanted to get my hands dirty with jQuery, unfortunately it was after 1am and I had to work the next day.

In Chapter 4, we move onto Drupal's Behaviors, which is covered in great detail. Behaviors are a key part of Drupal's JS implementation and essentially provide an events based hooks system in JavaScript. Once again Matt spends a lot of time explaining this feature, how it works, how to use it and where to learn more. Matt's description of this feature had me thinking "OMG, Drupal behaviours are awesome" throughout the chapter.

Lost in Translations, is the name of a good movie starring Scarlett Johansson and Bill Murray, which I enjoyed watching a few years ago, oh and is also the fifth chapter of the book. I suspect that I am like many English speaking Drupal developers in that I use the basics of the Drupal translation engine, but pay very little attention to how it works as my target audience is English speaking like me. Not only does Matt explain how Drupal's translation system works in both PHP and JavaScript, he makes it clear why all Drupal developers should understand and use the system - regardless of their native/target language/s.

The JavaScript Themeing chapter was a bit of a surprise for me. I was expecting Drupal to have a JS equivalent to PHPTemplate and for this chapter to outline it and provide some code samples. Instead I learn that Drupal has a very simple, and easy to use, JS themeing system. Matt spends some time discussing best practice for themeing content in JS and goes on to provide the code for his own simple yet powerful jQuery based themeing engine for Drupal.

In AJAX and Drupal Web Services, we learn about JSON, XML and XHR in the context of Drupal. Once again Matt demonstrates the ease of using Drupal and jQuery for quickly building powerful functionality.

Chapter 8 is entitled, Building a Module, and covers the basics of building a JS enabled module for Drupal. Matt also discusses when JS belongs in a theme and when it should be part of a module. The cross promotion of his other book Learning Drupal 6 Module Development ramps up a couple of notches in this chapter. I found the plugs a bit irritating (especially as I own a copy of the book), but overall the chapter is loaded with useful information.

The final chapter, Integrating and Extending, leaves the reader with a solid understanding of what can be done to make jQuery even more useful. This chapter provides a nice motivational finish to the book.

At the start of each chapter Matt recaps what has been covered and outlines where the chapter is heading which makes it easy to get back into the book after putting it down for a few days.

This book is definitely not for the copy and paste coder, nor the developer who just wants ready made solutions they can quickly hack into an existing project. Some may disagree, but I think this is a real positive of this book. Matt uses the examples to illustrate certain concepts or features which he wants the reader to understand. I found the examples got me thinking about what I wanted to use JS and jQuery for in my Drupal sites. Although some of the code samples run to several pages, Matt then spends a lot of time explaining what is happening in bit sized chunks, which makes it easy to understand. I also appreciated the links to documentation so I could get the information I'd need to write my own code for my projects.

One thing which always annoys me about Packt books is the glossy ink they use. In some lighting conditions it is too shiny, which makes it annoying to read, especially with a bed side lamp. On the positive side, the paper is solid and easy to turn.

Sprinkled through the book is some cross promotion of other Packt titles, which I have no issue with, it is a good opportunity to try to grab some additional sales. In a couple of the later chapters it becomes a bit too much. I think once or twice per chapter is reasonable.

I really enjoyed reading Drupal 6 JavaScript and jQuery, it is easy to read and the chapters are a size which lend themselves to being read in a session. I think any Drupal developer who wants to get into using JS in their sites/projects would benefit from reading this book. I finished it feeling like I wanted to start doing some hacking. I plan to update this site in the next few months, and now jQuery enabled effects is on the requirements list. I hope I can bump into Matt Butcher at a DrupalCon or somewhere else in my travels so I can buy him a beer to thank him for putting together a quality book.

Disclaimer Packt Publishing gave me a dead tree copy of this book to review it and keep. I'm glad they gave me a good title to review.

Drupal Book Review

OK, I am not reviewing a book today, but I soon will be. Packt Publishing have asked me to review Matt Butcher's new book Drupal 6 JavaScript and jQuery. The book looks pretty interesting. Alhtough it isn't on the same scale, being asked to review a serious Drupal developer book, is a bit like Obama winning the noble peace prize - ok maybe I am exaggerating a little there.

I really like YUI, but Drupal has made me interested in jQuery. One of the things awesome things about Drupal is that you can use jQuery without ever having to touch jQuery. This has made me lazy about learning jQuery - especially in the context of Drupal. It look like I have run out of excuses.

The book should arrive in France by the end of the week, but I won't be back in France for a couple of weeks, I have heading off to China for 10 days or so to catch up with friends and discuss some ideas about doing cool things with Drupal. Watch this space.

Missing Software Freedom Conference Kosova

Today I should be in Prishtina Kosovo running Drupal workshops at the first Software Freedom Conference Kosova. Unfortunately due to work and family commitments I had to decline the invitation. I hope to make it there next year.

I will also be missing out on DrupalCon Paris next week too.

Sometimes it sucks to be in Australia, especially when Europe is so far away and so many cool things happening there too.

Back Blogging Again

Bless me internet for I haven't blogged, it has been 274 days since my last post.

I have wanted to blog, but I kept on finding excuses to avoid it - need to upgrade the software, need to finish x, y and z, need to focus on projects a, b and c etc. One of the main reasons is that I have been too lazy to put the effort in. I find it takes time to think of what to blog and then to bash it out, refine it and post it. When I have had the time to put that effort into my blog, I haven't had the inclination.

While things have been quiet here, I have microblogging using the open source laconica platform through identi.ca, which also posts to StixCampNewstead.

More recently I have been working with a client in France who has some serious collaboration requirements. At last count they have almost 2100 instances of drupal running. This has involved a lot of work, and some travel. I will blog about this project soon - it is pretty awesome (even if I say so myself).

We have built a small drupal powered site for a local assest management consulting business. They are very happy with the results. Now their customers just log in to download the software. Everything was off the shelf drupal - except for the theme and a 60 line custom permissions module.

We have built the Newstead community website using drupal. It still needs some polish before final launch. The community has been heavily involved in the development of the site. So far over 30 locals have been trained in maintaining their page/s on the site. There is no "webmaster", each local business and community group will maintain their own content

A couple of months ago I/we joined the drupal association. One day the buttons will be added to the site.

Where to next?

I plan to blog more about projects I am involved in. I also plan to switch this site to drupal 7 as close as possible to the release date - it looks like others will be switching too. Next week I will be commencing the build of the Newstead community wireless network.

Watch this space, lots happening - including more frequent updates from here on in.

Updated IMCE plugin for Drupal YUI Editor

My IMCE plugin for YUI Editor has been included in drupal CVS and the 6.x-2.33 release. Now I can claim to have code included in an official drupal release, ok it is a small plugin for a contrib module, we all have to start somewhere.

The version included in Drupal only supports YUI 2.5.x as the API has changed in 2.6. I have a new version which supports 2.6.x, but it has a layout bug, so I won't be submitting it until this bug is fixed. If you can tolerate the visual bug or want to help fix it, grab the lastest version of the IMCE plugin for Drupal's YUI Editor. Use the same installation instructions as last time.

Feedback welcome.

YUI Editor + IMCE for Drupal 6

Update: This has now been included in the 6.x-2.33 release of Drupal's YUI Editor module and I have added support for YUI 2.6.

Earlier today I finished off another Drupal based site. The client was pretty happy with it. Once they launch I will probably post a link.

The client came back to me and asked how they could insert images using the RTE. Based on some positive reviews I used the YUI Editor module this time around, instead of FCKEditor or tinyMCE for the rich text editor. The YUI Editor module doesn't support file browsing. I tried to see if someone had already hacked something together for this, if they had I couldn't find it.

In the past I have used the IMCE module for image browsing and uploading in FCKEditor or tinyMCE. Adding IMCE support to the YUI Editor module seemed like the fastest solution.

So here it is - the IMCE based image browser plugin for YUI Editor on Drupal 6.

Here is a quick howto. Install the YUI Editor and IMCE modules into your Drupal 6 install. Save the plugin tarball into your modules directory above the YUI Editor module and extract it. You should now have 2 extra files yui_editor/plugins called img_browser.inc and img_browser.js

Feel free to leave comments about how well this works for you. Enjoy!

A Virtual Host per Project

Not long before my old laptop got to the end of it usable lifespan I started playing with the Zend Framework in my spare time. One of the cool things about ZF is that it wants to use friendly URLs, and a dispatcher to handle all the requests. The downside of this approach, and how ZF is organised, it works best if you use a Virtual Host per project. At first this seemed like a real pain to have to create a virtual host per project. One Saturday afternoon I worked through the apache docs and found a solution - then I found it fantastic. Rather than bore you with more of my views on Zend Framework, I will explain how to have a virtual host model that requires a little work up front and is very low maintenance.

It gets tedious copying and pasting virtual host config files each time you want to start a new project, so instead I let Apache do the work for me.

I added a new virtual host config file called projects to

/etc/apache2/sites-available
. The file contains

UseCanonicalName Off

LogFormat "%V %h %l %u %t \"%r\" %s %b" vcommon

<Directory /home/dave/Projects>
Options FollowSymLinks
AllowOverride All
</Directory>

NameVirtualHost 127.0.0.2
<VirtualHost 127.0.0.2>
	ServerName projects

	CustomLog /var/log/apache2/access_log.projects vcommon

	VirtualDocumentRoot /home/[username]/Projects/%1/application/www
	AccessFileName     .htaccess
</VirtualHost>

The important bit is the VirtualDocumentRoot directive which tells Apache to map a hostname to a path. I use an IP address from the 127.0.0.0/8 range for the virtual host, so they aren't accessible to the outside world and I don't have to worry about it changing every time I check locations.

All of my projects live under ~/Projects and each one gets a directory structure that looks something like this.

[projectname]
  |
  +- notes - coding notes, like grep output when refactoring etc
  |
  +- resources - any reference material or code snippets
  |
  +- application - the code for the project
     |
     +- www - document root for vhost

There are usually other paths here too, but they vary from project to project.

To make this work there are few more steps. First enable the new virtual host

$ sudo a2ensite projects

Don't reload apache yet.

Next you need to add the apache module

$ sudo a2enmod vhost_alias

Time to edit your

/etc/hosts
file so you can find the virtual hosts. Add a line similar to this
127.0.0.2 projects phpgw-trunk.project [...] phpgw-stable.project

Now you can restart apache.

$ sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 reload

This is handy for developing client sites - especially using drupal.

Now my

/var/www/index.html
is just an empty file.

I am getting a bit bored with adding entries to

/etc/hosts
all the time. If I get around to adding dnsmasq with wildcard hosts to the mix, I will post a follow up.

This setup is based on my current dev environment (Ubuntu Hardy), but it also works on older versions of Ubuntu. The steps should be similar for Debian and derivatives. For other distros, it should work, just how to make it work may be a little different. Feel free to post tips for others in the comments.