nokia

ACMA Investigates Nokia for SMS Spam

The ongoing saga of Nokia's txt spam continues.

The bad news is that I received another txt from Nokia today. This comes after being told by Nokia that I would no longer receive any txts from them. The message reads:

Tip: Use less battery power and help conserve energy with a few helpful tips from Nokia. Vist http://environment.nokia.mobi to learn more.

I have an energy saving tip for Nokia, stop sending txt messages I don't want, then I won't waste energy on trying to make them stop.

Now for the good news. A little while ago ACMA told me that they were preparing to launch a formal investigation into Nokia's SMS messages under the Spam Act. It's now official. Late last Friday I received the following email from the ACMA Investigator handling the matter:

Dear Mr Hall

I write with reference to your complaint #XXX concerning allegations of breaches of the Spam Act 2003 (Spam Act). The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has now commenced an investigation into Nokia Australia Pty Ltd about potential contraventions of the Spam Act. During the course of this investigation, the ACMA may require you to provide more information about any dealings you have had with Nokia Australia Pty Ltd and potentially complete a witness statement. The Anti-Spam Team will contact you in due course if this is required. The Anti-Spam Team does not provide your personal information to the business apart from the electronic account information (mobile telephone number) you have already provided. As I am sure you can appreciate, the ACMA is not able to disclose details of the investigation with you, but will advise you when an outcome has been determined. On behalf of the ACMA, I appreciate your assistance in this investigation and thank you for your cooperation.

Information about the Spam Act is available on our website at www.spam.acma.gov.au Please contact us if you have any queries.

I wonder how much energy Nokia will put into defending itself to ACMA.

Watch this space for more news.

Making My Nokia SMSes Stop

This is a public service announcement.

Tracy Postill, Corporate Communications Manager at Nokia Australia sent me this response when I enquired as to why it had taken more then 6 months for me to be unsubscribed from the My Nokia service.

There are a number of very simple processes to unsubscribe:

- sending "stop" to +61416906978

- through My Nokia application in phone

- online at www.nokia.com.au/mynokia

- request "unsubscribe" through [email protected]

- Nokia Customer Care (Carline or email support)

This information is presented to consumers in multiple ways:

- after signing in via phone, customer receives a welcome message and information on how to opt-out (SMS)

- ~20% of scheduled SMS contain opt-out information (SMS)

- in every sales pack, there are the T&Cs for MyNokia including all the details of how to opt-out

- My Nokia FAQ on https://my.nokia.com/appmanager/AustraliaEnglishMY_NOKIA_AUSTRALIA/Login?SAMLart=AAQAAYU6%2FZbJFfjRP3cckEAJmxKhSmx8sqF8q2CNtVwZBvZUL6lb%2FBg%2Fmio%3D&RelayState=qh8DL4DVL1Qp9q612ncWTwWvRp6QQKYB52xh1226HJJ1RP14NvQr!-432133733!1266205653496#faq14

My signup text message and terms and conditions were returned to Optus along with everything else that came with my N97. None of the txts I have recieved from My Nokia has contained any opt out information and the FAQ requires a My Nokia account to be able to access it.

I explained to Tracy that I think Nokia has major issues with their processes for unsubscribing from My Nokia, she has "sent this email to our head of care and asked him to follow up on this". I will post a follow up if I receive a response from "head of care". I hope this saves others the hassle of trying to unsubscribe from the service.

Update 25-Feb-2010 The txts have stopped. What an ordeal! Hopefully if you are reading this the options above work for you.

Nokia and TXT Spam

Last year I bought my 4th Nokia phone in a row, a N97 on contract from Optus. What a mistake that was. The phone would drop every second call and the user experience was less than I expected from Nokia. Telstra allow customers in the bush to test drive a handset for a few days or so to make sure it works where you need it, Optus on the other hand will sell you the handset but offer a "Coverage Satisfaction Guarantee". After about 2 weeks, I bailed out of the contract with Optus through the CSG, returning the handset to Optus and eventually not having to make any repayments on the handset.

When I first turned on the phone it gave me the option of activating My Nokia tips and special offers or something like that, I thought I would turn it on and see what tips and offers I could get. It turned out the tips weren't very useful and there were no offers, let alone anything I would call special. When I returned the phone I completely forgot about the My Nokia txts. I was to discover Nokia hadn't forgotten about me. About twice a month I continue to receive messages from My Nokia.

Back in September I got fed up with receiving the text messages, which contained no option for opting out, so I filed a complaint with ACMA. 6 weeks later I was advised by ACMA that they had contacted Nokia on my behalf and asked them to unsubscribe me. I assumed this would be the end of the matter. The messages continued, so I contacted ACMA again. Two weeks later I was told again that Nokia had been told by ACMA to unsubscribe me. The following day another text arrives. In early January I received the following response from ACMA.

Thank-you for your email, I have tried to unsubscribe you from receiving messages from My Nokia.

I received the following from a Nokia Email Support Executive on the 16 December 2009.

Thank you for contacting Nokia Careline. I have searched our records using the phone numbers that you have provided and I find that all of them are not present in our system which means that they have not contacted us even once. We will not be able to unsubscribe an account without the direct consent from the owner of the account. If the customer is having difficulty to unsubscribe from the service, they should contact us first so that we can assist them. There are several ways to unsubscribe from the My Nokia service.

These are as follows:

1. Using a PC, Login to My Nokia and click on Edit my Details

2. Using the phone, open the My Nokia icon and select "Unsubscribe"

3. Click the link at the bottom of the email message sent from My Nokia

Should you have any questions regarding our product or if we can be of any assistance, please feel free to contact one of our friendly Technical Support Executives on 1-300 366 733 between the hours of 8am and 8pm, AEST, seven days a week. For online assistance, please visit ‘ASK Nokia’ at our website

Have you attempted the above to unsubscribe from this service?

As I explained to ACMA, I have never installed any Nokia software on my PC, so option 1 is out. As I no longer have the handset, option 2 is out, it is txt not an email so option 3 wouldn't work, so I decided to call Nokia.

I called Nokia on the number listed above. After 15 minutes or so on hold, I got to speak to someone in a call centre on the sub continent. The line was appalling, to make matters worse the guy I was dealing with seemed to be the work experience kid on his first day. I would talk to him for a minute or 2, then be put on hold for 5 minutes or more while he put me "on hold for a minute while I check something". I don't think that there was a sentence I didn't have to repeat. In the end he terminated the call when I lost it after being asked to spell "Nokia" to him for a 3rd time. Almost an hour of my time wasted.

I called Nokia back. This time I was kept on hold again for around 20 minutes. As soon as the call was answered I demanded to speak to a supervisor. After further time on hold I got to speak to a supervisor. First he tried to tell me it was coming from Optus not Nokia and that I needed to contact them. Next I was told to use the My Nokia menu option, which I explained I didn't have. Finally he suggested that he could login to the My Nokia website and unsubscribe me - finally I was getting somewhere! Then I was asked for my password, I explained I didn't have one, "that's OK sir, you can go to the website and sign up for one". It was clear after almost another hour lost this was going no where, so I cut my loses.

After getting off the phone I looked at how much information Nokia wanted so I could sign up for My Nokia. There was no way I was going to give any company that much information just to stop them spamming me - they have the identity theft jackpot questions all there.

On Wednesday I phoned the person at ACMA who was handling my complaint. They claim ACMA is complying with the letter of the law as these are not unsolicited commercial messages, but rather factual services messages from a company I have a relationship with. Apparently you can spam people in Australia if the messages are factual. As these are factual messages, Nokia isn't even required to have an opt out option. Although such actions may be legal, I don't think they are a good way to build customer loyalty and confidence in a brand.

I'm not happy with this situation. Based on some quick math, I have spent 4 to 5 hours chasing this, which is time I wasn't billing clients. This means I am pretty much down the cost of a new phone outright. As things stand now, I am not feeling like recommending Nokia to family, friends or clients, instead I am more likely tell this story and discuss the lack of customer service. I am now also very unlikely to buy the N900 I have been admiring on amazon, let alone attend Forum Nokia Developer Conference 2010. Instead I am likely to import a Nexus One or some other open phone.

I hope someone reading this works for Nokia or has a contact there who can resolve this. If anything happens I will post an update.

Below are some of pearls of wisdom I've received from Nokia:

Tip: Automatically adding location information to your pictures means you'll never forget a place. In camera mode, select Options > Settings > Show GPS info

Tip: Find out if a surface is flat by using your device as a spirit level. Download the free Level Touch app by visiting http://nokia.mobi/os/leveltouch

Tip: Share your favourite places with Nokia Maps. When viewing a map, select a saved place, press Send, and then choose your preferred sending method.

Tip: Use the self-timer to make you don't get left out of the next family portrait. In camera mode select the Capture settings icon and select Self Timer.

Tip: Listen to music in stereo sound and manage your calls with the Nokia Stereo Headset WH-500. Visit [...]

Update 15-Feb-2010 @ 13:00AEDT I emailed Tracy Postill, Corporate Communications Manager at Nokia Australia, a link to my post. She raised the issue with Nokia Care who called me on Freiday evening and told me that they had tried some things, but it would take 2 weeks or so before they knew if it worked or not. I sent a follow up email to Tracy asking why was it so difficult to unsubscribe from My Nokia. I am still waiting on a response from Tracy.

My New Toy - The Nokia N95

About 7 weeks ago I bought a Nokia N95 and I love it. I considered the Neo 1973 from openMoko, a completely open phone platform was appealing, but at the end of the day it isn't certified for Australia, it doesn't have WIFI or a camera nor does it do HSDPA/3G, all things on must have list. The iPhone was never in the race.

I picked up phone for just over 800AUD via ebay, they have since dropped a little in price. It is an Australia version with full local warranty support. The only downside is that it a 3 branded version, not a generic, but hey it works.

The phone got a real work out during my trip to Norway and it worked well. The GPS is a little slow to lock, but once it gets a lock it is right to go. The wifi works well. It is handy knowing if wifi is available somewhere before booting your laptop. I took a stack of pictures with the 5M pixel camera, the ones in bad light or inside aren't fantastic, but when taking shots outside it works a treat. The "DVD quality video" is pretty good too. It makes better movies than our old DVD based handycam. I am planning to use the phone at the birth of my second child (due any day now).

As I expected the phone "just works" as a standalone device, but the real test is how well it works with a Linux desktop. I can report that with Ubuntu 7.10 (aka Gutsy Gibbon) the N95 works well for all the stuff you really need. Below is a couple of quick mini howtos for a few things that you might want to with your N95. Some of the instructions are generic enough that they may work with little (or no) change with other handsets.

Disclaimer: I accept no responsibility for any data loss or stress caused by you following these instructions. Also you should carefully check your warranty before trying any of this. That said - "I just worked for me".

Pairing

For the bluetooth related stuff below you will need to pair your phone and PC. The quickest and easiest way to do this is using the bluetooth-applet. Here is how to do it:

  • Install the bluez-gnome deb - sudo apt-get install bluez-gnome
  • Once installed you should have a bluetooth icon in your GNOME system tray, if not just run "bluetooth-applet &" from the console
  • Right click on the icon and click "Browse Devices"
  • Your phone should be in the list, click on it and then click the Connect button
  • On your phone enter a 4 digit PIN when prompted - it can be anything you like
  • The bluetooth icon will then flash, click on it and enter the same PIN
  • Now your phone and PC should be paired
  • To make sure they are paired we will connect via obex-ftp
  • Right click on the icon and click "Browse Devices"
  • Your phone should be in the list, click on it and then click the Connect button
  • When prompted on your phone allow the connection
  • Nautilus should now launch and you you 2 folders "C:" (internal phone memory) and "E:" (microSD card)

Your PC and N95 are now paired and should be able to communicate via bluetooth without any problems.

Exchanging Files

Copying files to/from the N95 can be a little slow. Lets go from slowest to fastest.

Bluetooth

Copying files using bluetooth is very simple with a gnome desktop and the N95 using OBEX-FTP. Just install OBEX-FTP support for nautilus - "sudo apt-get install gnome-vfs-obexftp". Anytime you want to access the files on your phone via obexftp, just fire up nautilus and type "obex:///" and wait for a list of devices to be displayed. Double click on your phone and you are right to go. It can be rather slow copying files from your phone to your PC this way, but if you don't want to find cables or card readers it works. By slow I mean 30mins for a 100Mb video to copy.

There is also the gnome-obex-server package, which allows you to push content from your phone onto your PC, but I found this slow and I had to jump through too many hoops on the phone to send a file.

USB Cable

The N95 comes with a USB cable with a mini USB connector for connecting your N95 to your PC. When you plug the cable in the phone asks you which mode you wish to use. If you select Mass Storage it is treated like a usb mass storage device by and gnome-volume-manager, so it is mounted as soon as you plug it in. You are then able to access your microSD card.

I haven't been able to get the "Media Player" mode to work with the desktop music players I have tried it with - Rhythmbox, Banshee and Amarok. When used in "Mass Storage" mode it is possible to use File > Scan removable media in Rhythmbox.

Card reader

This is the fatstest way to read data from the microSD card. On the N95 press the power button for half a second, scroll down the list of options and select "Remove memory card", then remove your card from your phone. Now just put in into the SD card adaptor that came with the phone and use it like a normal SD card. Transfers speeds are quite good using this method.

Sync

Setting up sync with the N95 and opensync was relatively painless. I am syncing contacts with evolution, I have also tried with calendar events, which seemed to work as well, I haven't tried todos as I don't use them.

Start off by installing the bits we need

$ sudo apt-get install multisync-gui opensync-plugin-evolution opensync-plugin-syncml

This should also install all the dependencies needed to make opensync work.

On the N95 go Menu > Tools > Sync > PC Suite > Edit Sync Profile. First start by editing the settings under Applications. Lifeblog, Text messages and Bookmarks aren't supported by opensync, so disable them but setting "Include in sync" to No. You can also disable Calendar, Notes (really ToDos) if you wish.

As I had already transferred contacts from my old SE v600i to the N95 and I wanted to sync with an existing addressbook I had some issues. Namely 2 contacts didn't want to sync - I never found out which ones. So I found the easiest way to setup the sync was to create a new addressbook in evo.

  • Go into contacts ([ctrl]-2)
  • From the menu select File > New > Addressbook
  • Fill in the information - Type: "On This Computer", Name: "Phone" (or something else that makes sense for you
  • Click OK
In your GNOME menu under accessories, select multisync-gui. Now we need to create the sync pair.
  • Click the Add button
  • Give the group a meaningful name, such as "n95-evo" and click apply
  • Click the edit button for your new group
  • Tick the checkboxes for those sources which you don't want to use - you must disabled note as this isn't supported by the N95, this list should match the config on your phone
  • Click the Add Member button
  • Select Evolution 2.x from the list of options and Click Apply
  • Select which addressbook you want to sync with - in our case "Phone" (or which ever one you created above)
  • Click the Add Member button
  • This time select SyncML over OBEX Client
  • This where your XML hacking skills come into it (or you can just use my config
    <config>
    	<bluetooth_address>AD:DR:OF:MY:FO:NE</bluetooth_address>
    	<bluetooth_channel>10</bluetooth_channel>
    	<interface>0</interface>
    	<identifier>PC Suite</identifier>
    	<version>1</version>
    	<wbxml>1</wbxml>
    	<username></username>
    	<password></password>
    	<type>2</type>
    	<usestringtable>1</usestringtable>
    	<onlyreplace>0</onlyreplace>
    	<recvLimit>0</recvLimit>
    	<maxObjSize>0</maxObjSize>
    	<contact_db>Contacts</contact_db>
    	<calendar_db>Calendar</calendar_db>
    	<note_db>Notes</note_db>
    </config>
    
    		
    Change AD:DR:OF:MY:FO:NE to the address of your phone Note: I have only been able to get the N95 to sync with opensync using bluetooth.
  • Click Close
  • Click the "Refresh" and the sync should start
  • You have now synced your Nokia N95 with your Linux desktop! YAY!
  • All of your contacts from your phone should now be added to your evo addressbook
  • In evolution, copy any contacts from other addressbooks to the "Phone" addressbook
  • In multisync-gui click the "Refresh" button again and wait for the sync to complete

After I make changes to either either my N95 or evolution contacts I sync them. If you are also syncing your calendar you probably want to sync at least daily

Occasionally you may get conflicts. The GUI allows you to choose which one you want to keep. Having merge support in the GUI would be nice, but I can live with one taking precedence over the other on a per record basis.

Firmware Upgrades and Installing Maps

You need a real box Windows XP to upgrade the firmware or install full maps on the phone. I quickly tried using the usb support in qemu to connect the phone to a virtual version of XP, but I couldn't get it to work. It would be nice if Nokia offered firmware upgrades "over the air" so you could just use WIFI to upgrade the phone's firmware.

You can load map data as you move around, using mobile data, but this is an expensive way of doing it. You only need the map loader software installed on the Windows machine and then you can use the phone in mass storage mode of the microSD card to load the map data. I might try loading map data via qemu one day, but I have all the maps loaded that I currently need.

Software

In terms of what extra software you might want to install on the phone, here is a list of what I am using:

  • PuTTY - SSH on the phone, it is handy when I really need SSH and I don't have my laptop with me. Goota love a phone running SSH2 with public key authentication.
  • VNC. There is a Symbian sponsored port of TightVNC now available for the N95 and other S60 handsets. I am yet to get working properly
  • Fring is a free (as in beer) VoIP and IM app for mobile devices. It works pretty well. I have some issues using it with NodePhone, but I probably just have to tweak something there
  • I am also running the Lotus Sametime client, so I can keep in touch with the ReSight team out on the road. Pidgin is still the best Sametime (or general IM) client I have found, but there is no symbian port (hint hint)

Where is opera mini? I removed it, as I found the WebKit based browser on the N95 nicer in the longer run. It might use more bandwidth, but that is fine when using WIFI for most of your browsing anyway.

Overall

The Nokia N95 is certainly one nice handset. The battery life sucks - mine goes on charge every evening. The phone will never win an award from the FSF for freedom, but it never set out to do that. It sets out to be an all in one device and I think it achieves that goal pretty well. It is certainly usable under Linux, even if it does have some distance to go before it can really be considered truly Linux friendly.

About 7 weeks ago I bought a Nokia N95 and I love it. I considered the Neo 1973 from openMoko, a completely open phone platform was appealing, but at the end of the day it isn't certified for Australia, it doesn't have WIFI or a camera nor does it do HSDPA/3G, all things on must have list. The iPhone was never in the race.

I picked up phone for just over 800AUD via ebay, they have since dropped a little in price. It is an Australia version with full local warranty support. The only downside is that it a 3 branded version, not a generic, but hey it works.

The phone got a real work out during my trip to Norway and it worked well. The GPS is a little slow to lock, but once it gets a lock it is right to go. The wifi works well. It is handy knowing if wifi is available somewhere before booting your laptop. I took a stack of pictures with the 5M pixel camera, the ones in bad light or inside aren't fantastic, but when taking shots outside it works a treat. The "DVD quality video" is pretty good too. It makes better movies than our old DVD based handycam. I am planning to use the phone at the birth of my second child (due any day now).

As I expected the phone "just works" as a standalone device, but the real test is how well it works with a Linux desktop. I can report that with Ubuntu 7.10 (aka Gutsy Gibbon) the N95 works well for all the stuff you really need. Below is a couple of quick mini howtos for a few things that you might want to with your N95. Some of the instructions are generic enough that they may work with little (or no) change with other handsets.

Disclaimer: I accept no responsibility for any data loss or stress caused by you following these instructions. Also you should carefully check your warranty before trying any of this. That said - "I just worked for me".

Pairing

For the bluetooth related stuff below you will need to pair your phone and PC. The quickest and easiest way to do this is using the bluetooth-applet. Here is how to do it:

  • Install the bluez-gnome deb - sudo apt-get install bluez-gnome
  • Once installed you should have a bluetooth icon in your GNOME system tray, if not just run "bluetooth-applet &" from the console
  • Right click on the icon and click "Browse Devices"
  • Your phone should be in the list, click on it and then click the Connect button
  • On your phone enter a 4 digit PIN when prompted - it can be anything you like
  • The bluetooth icon will then flash, click on it and enter the same PIN
  • Now your phone and PC should be paired
  • To make sure they are paired we will connect via obex-ftp
  • Right click on the icon and click "Browse Devices"
  • Your phone should be in the list, click on it and then click the Connect button
  • When prompted on your phone allow the connection
  • Nautilus should now launch and you you 2 folders "C:" (internal phone memory) and "E:" (microSD card)

Your PC and N95 are now paired and should be able to communicate via bluetooth without any problems.

Exchanging Files

Copying files to/from the N95 can be a little slow. Lets go from slowest to fastest.

Bluetooth

Copying files using bluetooth is very simple with a gnome desktop and the N95 using OBEX-FTP. Just install OBEX-FTP support for nautilus - "sudo apt-get install gnome-vfs-obexftp". Anytime you want to access the files on your phone via obexftp, just fire up nautilus and type "obex:///" and wait for a list of devices to be displayed. Double click on your phone and you are right to go. It can be rather slow copying files from your phone to your PC this way, but if you don't want to find cables or card readers it works. By slow I mean 30mins for a 100Mb video to copy.

There is also the gnome-obex-server package, which allows you to push content from your phone onto your PC, but I found this slow and I had to jump through too many hoops on the phone to send a file.

USB Cable

The N95 comes with a USB cable with a mini USB connector for connecting your N95 to your PC. When you plug the cable in the phone asks you which mode you wish to use. If you select Mass Storage it is treated like a usb mass storage device by and gnome-volume-manager, so it is mounted as soon as you plug it in. You are then able to access your microSD card.

I haven't been able to get the "Media Player" mode to work with the desktop music players I have tried it with - Rhythmbox, Banshee and Amarok. When used in "Mass Storage" mode it is possible to use File > Scan removable media in Rhythmbox.

Card reader

This is the fatstest way to read data from the microSD card. On the N95 press the power button for half a second, scroll down the list of options and select "Remove memory card", then remove your card from your phone. Now just put in into the SD card adaptor that came with the phone and use it like a normal SD card. Transfers speeds are quite good using this method.

Sync

Update: I am no longer using OpenSync. I am using Funambol's S60 SyncML app, which works a treat for syncing with my Zimbra server.

Setting up sync with the N95 and opensync was relatively painless. I am syncing contacts with evolution, I have also tried with calendar events, which seemed to work as well, I haven't tried todos as I don't use them.

Start off by installing the bits we need

$ sudo apt-get install multisync-gui opensync-plugin-evolution opensync-plugin-syncml

This should also install all the dependencies needed to make opensync work.

On the N95 go Menu > Tools > Sync > PC Suite > Edit Sync Profile. First start by editing the settings under Applications. Lifeblog, Text messages and Bookmarks aren't supported by opensync, so disable them but setting "Include in sync" to No. You can also disable Calendar, Notes (really ToDos) if you wish.

As I had already transferred contacts from my old SE v600i to the N95 and I wanted to sync with an existing addressbook I had some issues. Namely 2 contacts didn't want to sync - I never found out which ones. So I found the easiest way to setup the sync was to create a new addressbook in evo.

  • Go into contacts ([ctrl]-2)
  • From the menu select File > New > Addressbook
  • Fill in the information - Type: "On This Computer", Name: "Phone" (or something else that makes sense for you
  • Click OK

In your GNOME menu under accessories, select multisync-gui. Now we need to create the sync pair.

  • Click the Add button
  • Give the group a meaningful name, such as "n95-evo" and click apply
  • Click the edit button for your new group
  • Tick the checkboxes for those sources which you don't want to use - you must disabled note as this isn't supported by the N95, this list should match the config on your phone
  • Click the Add Member button
  • Select Evolution 2.x from the list of options and Click Apply
  • Select which addressbook you want to sync with - in our case "Phone" (or which ever one you created above)
  • Click the Add Member button
  • This time select SyncML over OBEX Client
  • This where your XML hacking skills come into it (or you can just use my config
    <config>
    	<bluetooth_address>AD:DR:OF:MY:FO:NE</bluetooth_address>
    	<bluetooth_channel>10</bluetooth_channel>
    	<interface>0</interface>
    	<identifier>PC Suite</identifier>
    	<version>1</version>
    	<wbxml>1</wbxml>
    	<username></username>
    	<password></password>
    	<type>2</type>
    	<usestringtable>1</usestringtable>
    	<onlyreplace>0</onlyreplace>
    	<recvLimit>0</recvLimit>
    	<maxObjSize>0</maxObjSize>
    	<contact_db>Contacts</contact_db>
    	<calendar_db>Calendar</calendar_db>
    	<note_db>Notes</note_db>
    </config>
    
    		
    Change AD:DR:OF:MY:FO:NE to the address of your phone Note: I have only been able to get the N95 to sync with opensync using bluetooth.
  • Click Close
  • Click the "Refresh" and the sync should start
  • You have now synced your Nokia N95 with your Linux desktop! YAY!
  • All of your contacts from your phone should now be added to your evo addressbook
  • In evolution, copy any contacts from other addressbooks to the "Phone" addressbook
  • In multisync-gui click the "Refresh" button again and wait for the sync to complete

After I make changes to either either my N95 or evolution contacts I sync them. If you are also syncing your calendar you probably want to sync at least daily

Occasionally you may get conflicts. The GUI allows you to choose which one you want to keep. Having merge support in the GUI would be nice, but I can live with one taking precedence over the other on a per record basis.

Firmware Upgrades and Installing Maps

You need a real box Windows XP to upgrade the firmware or install full maps on the phone. I quickly tried using the usb support in qemu to connect the phone to a virtual version of XP, but I couldn't get it to work. It would be nice if Nokia offered firmware upgrades "over the air" so you could just use WIFI to upgrade the phone's firmware.

You can load map data as you move around, using mobile data, but this is an expensive way of doing it. You only need the map loader software installed on the Windows machine and then you can use the phone in mass storage mode of the microSD card to load the map data. I might try loading map data via qemu one day, but I have all the maps loaded that I currently need.

Software

In terms of what extra software you might want to install on the phone, here is a list of what I am using:

  • PuTTY - SSH on the phone, it is handy when I really need SSH and I don't have my laptop with me. Goota love a phone running SSH2 with public key authentication.
  • VNC. There is a Symbian sponsored port of TightVNC now available for the N95 and other S60 handsets. I am yet to get working properly
  • Fring is a free (as in beer) VoIP and IM app for mobile devices. It works pretty well. I have some issues using it with NodePhone, but I probably just have to tweak something there
  • I am also running the Lotus Sametime client, so I can keep in touch with the ReSight team out on the road. Pidgin is still the best Sametime (or general IM) client I have found, but there is no symbian port (hint hint)

Where is opera mini? I removed it, as I found the WebKit based browser on the N95 nicer in the longer run. It might use more bandwidth, but that is fine when using WIFI for most of your browsing anyway.

Overall

The Nokia N95 is certainly one nice handset. The battery life sucks - mine goes on charge every evening. The phone will never win an award from the FSF for freedom, but it never set out to do that. It sets out to be an all in one device and I think it achieves that goal pretty well. It is certainly usable under Linux, even if it does have some distance to go before it can really be considered truly Linux friendly.

Vodafone Service Enquiry Response

Yesterday afternoon I received a txt message from my CALLscreen. service. The message was as follows:

ERIN FROM VODAFONE RE JUST WANTED TO ENSURE YOUR HAPPY WITH YOU SERVICES

That was it. No "call me back on 555 1234" or "will call you back later on today". Notice the use of your and you instead of you're and your?

Here is a list of issues I currently have with the service:

  • About 10% of my calls go straight to CALLscreen, even when I not on the phone, no missed call or anything. My handset is a SE v600i
  • My Nokia 6280 which was purchased under a 2 contract is almost useless yet my contract has 11 months to run. The warranty ran out at about the same as the phone stuffed up.
  • I would switch the phone I have on the Talk&TXT plan over to the $29 Jumbo Cap, but this is only available on prepaid.
  • 3G enabled the Tecoma tower, so I can get 3G call the way home from work
  • The Delight offers every 12 months is a nice touch, I am looking forward to getting a swiss army knife and magazine.

I would also be interested in seeing if I could get a better deal than the following, all postpaid on one bill.

  • The old $79 Super Cap (the one with CALLscreen included) with about 11 months to run
  • Talk&TXT with a monthly spend of about $40
  • 1Gb UMTS mobile data through Virgin $30 per month
  • 365 Plan prepaid mobile for sending the occasional txt message when a server falls over, this one isn't important

I have an ABN if that makes any difference to what can be offered.

If anyone has any ideas please feel free to leave a comment.

I would have been happy go through all of this Erin yesterday, but I wasn't given the opportunity to do so.

PS If you want to give me a Nokia N95 I will happily accept it and review it here after 2 weeks of use. hint hint :)